Waitress gets giant tip – Happy News

Written by on December 22, 2021

The UK-based Adfree Cities network – which grew from the Adblock Bristol group – supports residents to oppose billboard planning applications, then works with them to create a new vision for freed-up space. 

“We don’t want to be too prescriptive,” says Nicola Round, the network’s co-founder. “We ask the community if they want empty space, community arts or a mural by a local school for example. Or to plant trees or build a climbing wall. There’s so much exciting potential for these spaces.”

Advertising impacts us all, Round notes. It’s present in public spaces without our consent and we’re usually unable to avoid it. “There’s no active engagement, no conversation,” she says. “But there’s an opportunity to change that.”

Among the other UK groups working on the challenge is Badvertising, a campaign organised by the New Weather Institute thinktank and the climate action charity Possible. It’s calling for a stop to adverts that fuel the climate emergency, from cars and airlines to fossil fuels.

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Meanwhile, arts collective Brandalism uses ‘subvertising’ – transforming or replacing ads without permission – to challenge what they see as corporate control of culture and space.

Anne Cronin, professor of cultural sociology at Lancaster University, agrees that removing billboards can expand horizons, and that freeing up public space can lead to “new thinking and social connections” – with the opportunity for expression top of her list.

Creativity certainly surges from some of the projects carried out so far. In Bristol, Adblock created the Burg Arts project in the St Werburgh’s neighbourhood. It’s a rolling installation of art created by local people on a billboard that was previously used for commercial ads. 

Benoit Bennett, a member of Adblock’s art group, is adamant that people benefit deeply from being visually represented in their surroundings. “The contrast between that and a commercial billboard, so alienating to a lot of people, is huge. It shows that these spaces can be ours.” 

Benoit Bennett, a member of Adblock’s art group, is adamant that people benefit deeply from being visually represented in their surroundings. “The contrast between that and a commercial billboard, so alienating to a lot of people, is huge. It shows that these spaces can be ours.” 

 

Matt Manson

Colin Moody

Bristol photo-journalist Colin Moody has been snapping street screnes and night life for years. He explained the thinking behind his photograph of Bristol Waste workers:

“In my photography, I try and give a voice to those who we might not hear a lot from, or to peek into lives in a meaningful way that makes us realise how many layers of community there are in this city. We don’t always notice one person so when groups form in unexpected places I love to snap that and engage with my subject. Hands up for the waste team. Top job.”

Submitting new artwork

We’re looking for artworks that provide a positive alternative to corporate advertising. We welcome artworks that either:

  • celebrates community spirit / ethos,  or
  • celebrates the St Werburghs area in particular, or
  • celebrates Bristol’s radical history support for migrants, refugees, fighting for cycling lanes and green space, women’s history, support for independent businesses instead of chainstores.

However, the above is meant as a starting suggestion only and is not intended to be prescriptive.  We absolutely welcome other concepts and ideas.

The team are always looking for new artwork, to submit your art you can Contact arts[@]adblockbristol.org.uk to discuss your ideas.

A table attendant in Tennessee who’s been struggling was overwhelmed with gratitude when she received a giant tip from a local group called Tipping in the Boro.

 

Little Essentials – HELPING THEIR COMMUNITY

In 2010, Sandie Trombert, our founder, noticed local parents in need while many parents were looking for ways to help. She filled the gap by starting Little Essentials in 2011 as a non-profit to help low-income families in NYC.

One in three U.S. families lack enough diapers to keep a baby clean, dry and healthy. In 2020, they distributed 216,634 diapers to work towards ending diaper need in NYC.

 

You can donate or volunteer via the link below

https://www.littleessentials.org/

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